Contractors abandon Sh1.7bn road projects for non-payment

Mar. 30, 2018, 12:15 am

Construction of Outer Ring Road /MONICAH MWANGI
Construction of Outer Ring Road /MONICAH MWANGI
Road contractors have abandoned more than 60 projects since 2013 due to nonpayment by the county. The projects are worth Sh1.7 billion.
For years residents have been complaining about the high number of stalled projects and poor services by the county government.
The contractors who quit will lose out because the county will not pay them even for the little work they had done before they withdrew their services. City Hall has already re-advertised the projects.
Acting Transport chief officer Fredrick Karanja says many more infrastructure projects worth billions of shillings have stalled. But contractors have agreed to carry on with the work after the new administration committed to pay them.
“We have been engaging them and we will pay those who have agreed to come back. We have so far paid out Sh300 million,” Karanja said.
This comes as it emerged that at least four people are killed each day on the newly constructed Outer Ring Road in Eastlands.
Abandoned projects include John Osogo and Muigai Kenyatta roads in Dandora. The two, which lead to Dandora dumpsite, were allocated Sh210 million in the 2016-17 financial year. Others include Ole Sagane Road in Madaraka, which was being rehabilitated, construction of a non-motorised transport route in Kibera and rehabilitation of California Road in Eastleigh.
tenders paid
Transport executive Mohammed Dagane said non-payment of contractors is the sector’s main problem. In the current financial year, the executive said, Sh1.2 billion of Sh4.9 billion tenders awarded have been paid.
The two spoke during a breakfast meeting with journalists at the Sarova Stanley Hotel. All the CECs attended the forum.
Dagane also blamed the poor state of roads in the county on inadequate technical personnel, lack of county-owned basic construction equipment, under-investment in public transport and massive encroachment on road reserves.
Meanwhile, the county government has written to the Kenya Urban Roads Authority to construct footbridges and other safety structures to reduce the numbers accidents on the road.
“We have asked them to introduce safe crossing ways like tunnels and underpasses. But another problem is the habit of Kenyan drivers who always want to test their vehicles whenever a new road is built,” Karanja said.


Source: Bitumenexporter

No Money No Honey – Road Projects